STOCKING THE PANTRY + Wholefood Suppliers (NZ)

I keep all my jars stoked with the essentials – nuts, seeds, dried fruit – all easy access from my kitchen bench.

This week I am sharing with you the contents of my pantry. The most frequent inquiry I receive is ‘where do you source your dry goods’, so I thought I better get this up on the blog as it has been several months since some of you first asked me. I promise I will share the aromatic chicken tagine recipe next week. Besides, I had to make another batch of preserved lemons – I used the last lot up for my birthday dinner – and they won’t be ready until next week. For now, come join me, as we have a looksy into my pantry.

The Pantry / Homegrown Kitchen

Stocking The Pantry

As we eat mainly gluten-free at home I like to have a pantry full of gluten-free whole-grains, flours, nuts, seeds, dried beans and lentils. Plus dried fruit, nutritious sweeteners and a selection of super foods. I like to focus on nutrient-rich and wholesome food at home, and save the less healthy foods for occasional outings.

Wholegrains - rice, milet, quinoa, buckwheat, polenta

Wholegrains – rice, millet, quinoa, buckwheat, polenta. It is best to use wholegrains within several months of purchase or store in a cool dark cupboard.

Whole-grains / Flours / Dried Legumes

  • Flour > brown rice flour, buckwheat, tapioca (arrowroot) and coconut flour are the main gluten-free flours I use.
  • Rolled-oats and spelt (or Arawa*) > for making the occasional pastry.
  • Whole-grains > quinoa, millet, buckwheat, polenta, basmati/ jasmine rice, brown rice and medium grain white rice for risotto/ paella.
  • Dried legumes > split red lentils, green lentils (French), chickpeas, kidney beans, pinto beans
I keep all my jars stoked with the essentials - nuts, seeds, dried fruit - all easy access from my kitchen bench.

I keep all my jars stoked with the essentials – nuts, seeds, dried fruit – all easy access from my kitchen bench.

Dried Fruit / Sweeteners

  • Dried fruit – dates, apricots (sulfur-free), prunes, raisins, sultanas > check packets but most ‘brown’ dried fruit are naturally sulfur-free.
  • Raw honey, maple syrup, apple syrup
  • Unrefined golden sugar, muscovado sugar, rapadura sugar, palm sugar
New Zealand grown flaxseeds. I use these in my bread and baking to add omega 3 and help bind. Similar properties to chia seeds and 1/4 the price.

New Zealand grown flaxseeds. I use these in my bread and baking to add omega 3 and help bind. They have similar properties to chia seeds while 1/4 the price (and NZ grown!).

Nuts / Seeds / Super Foods

  • Nuts > almonds, cashews, brazil nuts, hazelnuts
  • Coconut > desiccated and flakes
  • Seeds > sunflower, sesame, pumpkin, flax seeds
  • Super foods > chia seeds, cacao nibs, spirulina, seaweed/ kelp
Coconut oil is used for adding to raw sweets and as the best moisturiser

Virgin coconut oil is added to raw sweets, mixed through porridge for an anti-microbial boost, and is the only moisturiser I use plus it makes an excellent deodorant.

Condiments / Oils / Seasoning / Spices

  • NZ sea salt & black pepper in a grinder
  • Cocoa/ cacao powder, carob, vanilla extract, baking powder/ soda
  • Vinegar > apple cider vinegar, rice vinegar, balsamic
  • Extra virgin olive oil + Ghee for cooking
  • Tamari (soy sauce), fish sauce, sesame oil, Worcestershire sauce
Ghee is a staple beside my stove along with olive oil and salt and pepper.

Ghee is a staple beside my stove top along with extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and pepper. I use it for cooking eggs, pancakes and fritters as it won’t burn like butter and can withstand high heats unlike olive oil. Find the recipe in my cookbooks.

Spices & Dried Herbs

  • Dried herbs > dried oregano and basil > fresh thyme, parsley, rosemary, sage and bay leaves in the garden.
  • Whole spices > cumin seeds, turmeric powder, coriander seeds, nutmeg, mustard seeds, fennel seeds, cardamom pods, cinnamon
I use New Zealand sea salt to season our food. The grey colour is an indication of its high mineral content. I also mix sea salt with kelp to boost iodine.

I use New Zealand sea salt to season our food. The greyish colour is an indication of its high mineral content. I also mix sea salt with kelp – 4 parts sea salt with 1 part kelp – to boost iodine from the kelp.

Canned Food / Pasta / Noodles

  • Canned chopped tomatoes, 400g and 800g
  • Coconut cream and milk
  • Chickpeas, re-fried beans, pinto beans
  • Gluten-free pasta, rice noodles and mung bean thread noodles
  • Sardines in spring water
  • Baked beans + sustainably fished tuna in spring water (For those days…)
I buy whole spices and grind fresh as needed in a mortar in pestle.

I buy whole spices and grind fresh as needed in a mortar and pestle.

Wholefood Suppliers

The following is a list of New Zealand wholefood suppliers. Please note, I am in no way endorsing any of these suppliers (in fact none of them even know I am writing this post), I am just sharing the knowledge I have gained over the years sourcing clean food for my family. Firstly, I like to support local suppliers so I start this list with my Nelson locals. However, I know many of you reading this live elsewhere so read on for other New Zealand based suppliers.

Local Nelson > Nelson Fresh Choice, The Organic Green Grocer, Prego Mediterranean Foods (including FYO local extra virgin olive oil), Nelson Bin Inn,

Fresh2U Organic Food DeliveryΒ  / Nelson – weekly organic produce boxes + bulk organic dry goods and products. Organic grower Wolfgang Mann and myself set up this service in 2005 and handed it over to Lucy Maxwell in 2012. Wolfgang is still the main certified organic produce supplier [and continues to help with the packing and sourcing of produce], and Lucy has increased the range to include dry goods and organic products.

The Wee Shop Ruby Bay/Mapua – Organic produce and dry goods. They have a grain mill in store so you can purchase your grains and have them freshly milled into flour.

Ceres Organics/ Auckland – wholesale bulk organic foods. A huge selection of dry goods, gluten-free products and natural health products. You do need to set up an account with Ceres either as a business (with references) or coop account (for the coop account there is a minimum monthly order of $300 – this works best if shared between 3-4 families with each family ordering on a 3-4 monthly rotation).

Chantal Organics/ Napier – wholesale bulk organic foods. Anyone can order from Chantal with a minimum order of $250. You can order 500gm pack downs up to 25kg sacks of dry goods.

Terrace Farms/ Canterbury – Ira & Geoff grow, harvest and mill flour fresh to order. They have *arawa wheat (similar to spelt), purple wheat, rye and buckwheat (beautiful fresh buckwheat flour). Email them for a price list terracefarmorganic@gmail.com

Milmore Downs North Canterbury > NZ grown grains. I haven’t ordered from this supplier but have recommendations from others.

Bio Grains Canterbury > mostly NZ grown grains and wholefood products, chock food, flour etc.

Natural Grocer > nuts, seeds, whole foods (I haven’t ordered here but I have heard from several people who found their products fresh and good prices.)

Health Post – supplements, natural beauty products, super foods

Lav Kokonas Virgin Coconut Oil – This exceptional coconut oil is made from FRESH coconuts, unlike others that take between 3 and 5 days to process. Grown to certified organic standards, in the fertile soils of Vanuatu, then processed without the use of excessive heat or chemicals. This oil is neither refined, bleached nor deodorised and definitely has the taste of fresh coconut. Once you taste it, you won’t want any other coconut oil in your pantry.

*Now this is where I would love your help to fill in the gaps so this can be resource for others. Please comment below with details of other NZ wholefood suppliers and also where you source your local wholefoods i.e. name and location of your local organic/ bulk food store. Thank-you kindly.

Now a Recipe…

Crispy Chickpeas / Homegrown Kitchen

Crispy Cumin Chickpeas

This is a quick pantry recipe I like to make for an afternoon snack or sprinkling on top of a salad. Generally I like to cook my own dried chickpeas and freeze them into portions for adding to meals. However, having several cans of chickpeas in the pantry is a must for whipping up a quick hummus or to make this snack.

Ingredients

400g can chickpeas, drained and rinsed

1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/4 tsp sea salt

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil a heavy based frying-pan over a moderate/ high heat (I use a cast iron frypan). Once hot, add the chickpeas, cumin and salt. The chickpeas should just cover the base of the pan. Cook, shaking regularly for 10 minutes until the chickpeas turn golden and crisp up a little. Note, they won't be crunchy but will have a nice crisp skin. Tip onto a plate lined with a paper towel, eat immediately.

Notes

If the chickpeas start to pop turn the heat down a little or they will turn to mush.

http://www.homegrown-kitchen.co.nz/2013/07/24/stocking-the-pantry/

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35 Comments on “STOCKING THE PANTRY + Wholefood Suppliers (NZ)”

  1. Fantastic post. Amazing looking pantry. I buy most of my bulk items from Davis Trading (20 Te Puni St Petone) and Moore Wilsons (there are 3 in Wellington). Also Steve’s Bulk barn in Palmerston North is fantastic. Mx

  2. I love your earthquake proofed pantry Nicola! Great tips – I didn’t realise that about the grey NZ sea salt which I use because I like that it is local but good to know it is rich in minerals as well. Do you keep larger supplies of nuts in the freezer or just buy small amounts and use fresh?

    1. Isn’t it great, I was glad to have the barriers the other day. It was quite a rumble here.
      Yes I keep most of our nuts in a cool dark pantry and some in the freezer – Brazil nuts, walnuts.

  3. Great post thank you! http://www.rebalance.co.nz is great for supplements, natural cleaners, skincare, kids stuff, etc. Also I am looking at getting your Feeding Little Tummies book. I have a little girl with a wheat allergy so wondering if there are many recipes in there I can use for her? She is a year old next month and I have no idea what to feed her! Thanks.

    1. Hi Leah, yes all the recipes in my book include alternative ingredient suggestions if applicable and ideas for substituting flours to make recipes gluten-free, wheat -free or dairy-free.

  4. Hi Nicola, I am keen to know more bout starting a Ceres account. I have tried to message you through the ‘contact’ up the top of your page but its not working for me. Could please private message me about how to go about starting an account? Thank you Taryn (tazza8@hotmail.com)

    1. Hi Taryn
      If you contact Ceres directly through their website letting them know you want to set up an account they will send you the details either for a business account or coop account. They might be a bit swamped with enquiries after my post as had quite a bit interest!
      Let me know if there is anything else I can help you with.

  5. I love your pantry (how large is it?) and the earthquake proofing . My daughter and I share bags of whole spices which she buys from Moore Wilson’s.

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  7. Hi do you know of any places that sell organic butter in the South Island and have a wholesale option for bulk orders?
    Thanks,
    Sita.

  8. A wonderful pantry! I’ve been reading Dr Libby’s latest book and came across your blog whilst searching for some whole food recipes. Luckily my parents have a whole food business in Christchurch that I can stock up from. Anyone can purchase online from them as well at http://www.lindstromfoods.co.nz. You’ve given me inspiration.

  9. I get all my beans, lentils etc from The Real Food Grocer on Maxwell Rd in Blenheim. They have lots of Organics also. Great site.

  10. Hey Nicola, do you know what the cheapest flour distributer is in nz? I love in Wellington and really want to start baking sourdough with freshly ground rye but might have to resort to buying my own grain grinder and rye berries if i can’t afford the cost of courier!

    1. Hi Natalie, try Chantal or Ceres for the wholesale organic flour. Otherwise getting a grain mill is a fabulous idea for fresh flour and can be very economical if you make a lot of bread.

  11. Hi Nicola, Great web site, first time reader. Bulk foods post edictally what I was looking for. Also it seems if you are into the home grown kitchen, you are probably into good health for you and your family, friends etc. I know of a great book, which at first glace it may seem a little radical but with all the supporting evidence throughout the book you may find some very helpful information. Book best listen to as a story book. So if your interested in good health, weight loss and avoiding many degenerative diseases check it out…The China Study.. By T. Colin Campbell… Thanks for the very helpful; information.. Sunny Days πŸ™‚ Aali

  12. Hi Nicola, Hope it’s okay to add our healthy food online store to this post. We have been working really hard the last year to get a great range of healthy foods in stock http://foodcompass.co.nz. I have to mention, having taken so many photos of food for own website, I can really appreciate your photos on this site. Wish I had half your skill of taking and presenting food shots.

    1. Thanks Paul! That is fine to share your shop link here, that is the purpose of this page as so many people were asking me where to source good quality and affordable whole foods.

  13. Perfect post! We’re looking to return to NZ from Sydney where we’ve been availing ourselves of bulk co-op organic goodness, and glad to know our Aotearoa larder will. be. sorted. Wahoo! Looking forward. Thanks πŸ™‚

  14. Anyone tried wholegrainorganics.Co.nz ?? Looks good πŸ™‚ thanks for all the awesome info and links x

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